Cursed Edited by Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane

I am sitting here staring at my screen. We are living through crazy times right now. This book came at the perfect time. Losing yourself in stories that feel familiar but new is helpful during times of stress. I am not one to get stressed about a lot of things. But the way things are at the moment have kinda have thrown me for a loop. So I was so glad to have something to bury my head in. If you love stories by amazing story tellers you NEED to pick this up.

Thank you for my review copy Titan Books!!!

Synopsis: An anthology of new dark fairytales!!

What I liked: OMG. Reading this anthology was like watching a amazing story teller tell a story. It was so comforting but very familiar at the same time. Each story felt like a warm blanket. Some old favorites twisted into a modern stories and new stories. All the stories in the anthology fit so well well together. There is so so much to love about this anthology. The beauty in which some of the authors write made my heart soar with happiness.

What I didn’t like: There is absolutely nothing that I didn’t like

Star Rating: 5

My Thoughts: Anthologies are hard to review. I don’t want to say too much about one story in particular. They are all fantastic. I know I should be saying more about my thoughts….and normally I would but. I can’t find the adequate wording too describe the comfort that Cursed brought me over the last week. Please pick this up if you need something for your brain or your heart.

The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo

I have a love for folklore especially with a feminist type twist. I also love magic. This year I am really dedicating myself to read diverse authors. When I started with the LOHF I didn’t realize how much my reading was being stinted by following the herd. I am here for Women in translation, POC authors and women horror authors. This doesn’t mean that I am not going to read male authors. But, I am finding so many amazing stories. The Empress of Salt and Fortune is one of these stories. Thank you Tor for my review copy!!

Synopsis: A handmaid tells her story to a cleric.

What I liked: Vo’s writing is magical. She is able to transport you to the place that she was writing about. The fantastic elements of the story will leave you breathless. The story reminded me of an onion or an artichoke. The outside is the beginning of the story, as the story progresses each layer is revealed. Chapter by chapter the story unfolds and with it the hopes of the characters. You want the characters to win. As a reader I didn’t want the story to end. It was one of those stories that pulled you in and wouldn’t let you go.

What I didn’t like: Nothing

Star Rating: 5 Stars

My thoughts: After finishing the novella I sat and stared at the wall for about 10 minutes. There are so many things that I want to say, however; I don’t want to give away any of the story. This is a beautiful story. It is a story about love, heartache, diaspora and revenge. It made me so happy just reading all the beautiful words. The ending was everything I wanted it to be. I heart this book so much!

The Empress of Salt and Fortune drops on March, 24th!!

Bog Tour: The Golden Key by Marion Womack


In the last couple of years there has been a increase in authors who release playlists while they are either working on their project or after they are done with their projects. This gives readers a glimpse into how their minds think when they are working. I am pleased to be part of the blog tour for The Golden Key. Marion has put together a great playlist that she was using while she was writing it.


The Golden Key – From The Golden Key Playlist

by Marian Womack

I write to music. I find it easier to concentrate and get into my own head. Music helps me evoke the right mood, find the right words. The Golden Key is a dark, uncanny novel. This means that the list below – and my usual preferences for music as well – is dark and slightly weird. I favour female singers, and I like to write to the sound of song; I do not mind hearing words as I write. As English is not my first language, I found the words more comforting than distracting, solitary beacons that throw messages at me in my chosen language. But I also like writing to classical music, to Celtic music, to a few operas that I love. In a way, it is strange to share the music I like writing to. It feels more intimate than speaking about my favourite books or poems; almost as if I were opening a window into the inner workings of my brain.

(1) Isobel, Bjork (Post, 1995): Brought to you by the original, one and only queen of weird music, Isobel by Bjork is the ultimate dark fairy-tale. The rhythms are hypnotic, the lyrics tell a story of female self-sufficiency, of a fearless girl, surviving the many things that lurk behind the trees. You can almost hear the rustling of the wind, the creatures advancing towards your refuge, and also the hope, in that tune in crescendo.

(2) Yes, Anastasia, Tori Amos (Under the Pink, 1994)Under the Pink was the first Tori Amos album I heard. The encounter was providential, at a time when I was struggling to find my own voice as a writer. It is difficult for me to choose a track, the album is utter perfection, and it meant so much for me. I have written often to the final one, Yes, Anastasia, a marvel of a 10 minutes song, or rather experience, the feels timeless, and goes from delicacy to intensity in a heartbeat, like an ocean throwing wave after wave. Some of Amos’s songs are like short stories, so filled are they with meaning. Her piano, her vocals, the orchestra that appears out of nowhere, all contribute to the storytelling, and make this a memorable track, difficult to get out of your head.

 (3) Black Dove, Tori Amos (From the Choirgirl Hotel, 1998): Another Tori Amos favourite to get into the right writing mood. In the same dark-fairy tale vein as IsobelBlack Dove is also a telling, perhaps retelling, of a familiar story, of a tale that we have heard sitting around the fire. Another highly hypnotic track, in great measure thanks to Amos’ vocals, to that way she has of pacing slowly across a song, making sure all the meanings are spoken, and creating a new space of possibility, where the unexpected is allowed to enter the room. 

(4) The Dark Night of the Soul, Loreena McKennitt (The Mask and the Mirror, 1994): I am very fond of this album by Loreena McKennitt. She has stated that her inspiration for it was the mixture of cultures that lived together in fifteenth century Spain, and that it was inspired by a journey that took her through Andalusia, Morocco, and beyond. Still, there is space for the Celtic Irish tunes that mirror the melodies from the North of Spain, and for Prospero’s speech, speaking not so much of the universality of Shakespeare, as to the fact that we are all overcome by the same emotions. This particular love song is a translation by a mystic Spanish poet, San Juan de la Cruz, and depicts his love for God. But its lyrics are intriguing, and its place in the middle of the album allows it to be read as a love song for a lost moment in time when the coexistence of different cultures was not impossible. 

(5) Go Long, Joanna Newsom (Have One on Me, 2010): Joanna Newsom is my favourite performer. I have seen her play in several countries, and she is the one musician I have followed obsessively since her first EP. Go Long is a track from her triptych album Have One On Me, a musical feast which has space for this retelling of Bluebeard, one of the fairy stories I am most obsessed with. The verse ‘what a woman does is open doors / it is not a question of locking or unlocking’ is a haunting reminder of the curiouser and curiouser theme running through my work.

(6) Autumn, Joanna Newsom (Have One on Me, 2010): Another one by Newsom. The death of Summer, the advent of Autumn, the year quickening to an end. There is something magical about Autumn, my favourite season of the year; and this quiet tale, where “even the ghosts / huddled up for warmth”, is the perfect reckoning 

(7) Rubycon, Part 1 and 2, Tangerine Dream (Rubycon, 1975): A track as old as I am! I find it very easy to get lost in this dual track, and seek it out deliberately when I am looking to write a weird or uncanny piece. The ending is suitably unnerving, the piece in its entirety like an episode of Sapphire and Steel on steroids. Unmissable weird music.

(8) Nu Solen Gar Ned (The Sun is Setting), Trio Mediaeval (Folk Songs, 2007): Trio Mediaeval is another of my writing staples; any album, and track. Overwhelmingly immersive, truly inspiring stuff. 

(9 y 10) Piano Concert Number 20 in D Minor, Mozart; & Bluebeard’s Castle, Bartók: When I don’t want lyrics, I look for something equally inspiring and gloomy. These two fit the bill perfectly! 


Keep reading if you want to know more about The Golden Key.

Synopsis: London, 1901. After the death of Queen Victoria the city heaves with the uncanny and the eerie. Séances are held and the dead are called upon from darker realms.

Samuel Moncrieff, recovering from a recent tragedy of his own, meets Helena Walton-Cisneros, one of London’s most reputed mediums. But Helena is not what she seems and she’s enlisted by the elusive Lady Matthews to solve a twenty-year-old mystery: the disappearance of her three stepdaughters who vanished without a trace on the Norfolk Fens.

But the Fens are a liminal land, where folk tales and dark magic still linger. With locals that speak of devilmen and catatonic children found on the Broads, Helena finds the answer to the mystery leads back to where it started: Samuel Moncrieff. 

There is one more stop on the blog tour is Looking Glass Reads!!

The Return by Rachel Harrison

There are a ton of books about female friendships. Female friendships are different beasts. Especially if the friendship began during school and then continued into early adulthood. They change and morph into different entities. You may still love those people but there are things that you no longer share with them. Your life may not be as intertwined any longer. People move, get married, have children and change jobs. What happens when one of those friends disappears and comes back completely different? The Return is about exactly that. Thank you to Berkley for sending me a review copy!! The Return goes on sale in the US on March, 24th 2020.

Synopsis: When Julie goes missing for two years and comes back completely different what do her friends do?

What I liked: I really enjoyed the story. The premise was interesting and kept me engaged. The pacing was fast. There was a lot of dialog between the characters which is something I really enjoyed. It gave you a peek into the relationship dynamics between the four women. I really enjoyed the build up of the story. There is a lot of emotion in the build up of the story. This emotional buildup helped understand the back stories of all the characters and really helped the reader understand the dynamics between the characters. I also like that Harrison brought diversity into the story. Especially, bodily difference and LGBTQIA+ representation.

What I didn’t like: Nothing…..

Star Rating: 4.5 stars

My thoughts: After I finished I went back and read some reviews. I felt like many reviews that were critiquing the portrayal of the female relationships weren’t being very honest with themselves. I felt like Harrison took a look at how many female friendships are and got it pretty accurately. What I found interesting is that if you combine the traits of the four women you can make a whole woman. Each of them display traits that we all have. I have had these types of friendships and these types of friends. You celebrate your victories and help each other when you are down but you don’t necessarily give them a blow by blow of your life. I felt like the women in the story were growing and evolving through the story. Friendships….especially women’s friendships are complicated and it was refreshing to see that complication written about in a story.

#LOHFReadathon Book that has Been on your TBR forever: The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein

I have a deep and undying love for the story of Victor Frankenstein and his monster. The story makes me happy and sad at the same time. Reading the story makes me happy but aspects of the story make me sad. The monster’s story itself makes me sad. Abandoned and cast off by Victor. This retelling is wonderful and such a different take on what caused Victor to be the way he was. It also gave you more of an insight into the family dynamics of the Frankensteins. If you love the story of the monster I suggest that you pick this up immediately!! I picked up my copy at the Tucson Festival of Books.

Synopsis: The story of Victor Frankenstein’s wife.

What I liked: The writing is lush and delicious. The characterizations are so well written. The twist in the story I didn’t see coming. However, I enjoyed the crime element of the book. (I can’t say any more than that about it, or I will give it away.) The pacing is perfect. The story unfolds little bit by little bit in front of your eyes like a present. As a reader and lover of the original story I am always worried about retellings. But this is so well done you can feel the love that White has for the original. The retelling was lovingly written. It was dark and had so many details. The flashbacks throughout the chapters allowed you to see into the madness of Victor. It really builds upon the original.

What I didn’t like: There is nothing that I didn’t like about this story.

Star Rating: 5 Stars

My thoughts: HOLY HELL!!! I am totally kicking my self. I have had this book for close to a year on my TBR and I hadn’t read it till now. Everyone, I knew who had read it loved it and told me I would as well. They were right. I LOVED it. LOVE it. It was an amazing retelling of Frankenstein. if you haven’t read it then you are missing out on so so much goodness. There is a crime element to the story and I loved it. The backstory was amazing and I was totally there for it.

Infested by Carol Gore

In horror movies there is a period of time that is referred to as the atomic age. This is a period during the 1950s where movies were about how radiation would effect wildlife or even humans. When you look at what was going on in the world during that period of time the nuclear radiation movies make total sense. It had only been 5 years since the US had dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. People saw first hand the horrible reality of this new harnessed power. People didn’t know what the radiation was going to do. There had never before been anything on this planet that had the destructive capability of the atomic bomb. So they turned their fear into movies about ordinary insects and reptiles into monster of enormous size that thirsted after humans. The atomic age of movies died down with the introduction of slasher movies. There was a resurgence in the late 80s/ early 90s where chemicals and not radiation would be the cause of mutation. Infested reminded me of all the movies in the 50s with a splash of 90s nostalgia. Thank you to the author for sending me a review copy.

Synopsis: A park ranger goes to battle with a infestation.

What I like: Gore’s writing was fast paced and fit with the story she was telling. The characterizations were familiar but that allowed me to root really hard for the main character. LOL. The premise of the story really made me happy. I always enjoy a new take on an old favorite. The new take was fresh and I appreciated it. I was totally there for the twist. What I enjoyed was that the twist was taken from the pages of science. I really enjoy when there is an element of non-fiction in the horror I am reading

What I didn’t like: Nothing

Star Rating: 4

My thoughts: I felt like the characters were characters that I had read before. However, that didn’t dampen my enjoyment of the story. Mind you I read a lot and watch a lot of movies. This was just something that I noticed. That didn’t take away from my enjoyment of the story. I can’t say too much about the twist BUT, I do know that National Parks have looked into this and I can say that my state actually does this. After reading Infested I am a little wary of it.

Benny Rose The Cannibal King by Hailey Piper

As a kid of the 80’s I remember going to this video rental place. This was before blockbuster came to town. It was in this old house. I was in about 4th grade the first time I was allowed to pick out a movie on my own. Honestly, I don’t remember what it was. But to walk through the aisles of movies. Picking the VHS cover up and reading the back was such a big deal. Normally, my parents wouldn’t have let me pick out my own movie by myself but this time they did. Remembering back to those times makes me happy and nostalgic. Those are good memories, but I also remember around the same time that kids were going missing in my home town. No one I knew went missing, but there were plenty of stories. Stories told at lunch and on the playground. Kids whispering behind their hands about what happened to the missing kids. Too bad the truth was much worse than the stories. Benny Rose The Cannibal King took me back to the 80s. Thank you to the author for sending me a review copy.

Synopsis: Some girls and their encounter with the cannibal king.

What I liked: Piper does it again with her fast paced tale of Benny. the premise of the story was amazing. The pacing of the novel was fast and action packed. Piper’s characterizations really made you feel all the feelings for the characters as the story went along. Sadness, anger and heart pounding fear for them. There is a twist in the story which I didn’t see coming and it knocked me upside my head. The legend of Benny Rose was something that we all possibly heard when we were kids. It was crafted in such a way that it would have been one of those stories that kids would have sat around on Saturday nights telling with torches under our chins. The climax was fast paced and action packed…..heart pounding. The ending was fantastic. Even though…..you have a suspicion that the ending isn’t the ending. It has that wonderful open ending where the reader can continue the story in their head.

What I didn’t like: There wasn’t anything that I didn’t like.

Star Rating: 5 Stars!!

My thoughts: Because, it was early and I haven’t had enough coffee I actually overwrote my other review so I am retyping this. LOL. Piper absolutely floored me with this story. It was such a unique take on how urban legends grow and take on a life of their own. Even if many of them are based on a loose reality. But this story hit all the high notes for me. It was deliciously gory with a heart! So much heart. Piper is one to watch folks I have been saying it. I can’t wait to see what else Piper has up her sleeve.

So, if you want to know what happened to the missing kids. The truth is always much worse than fiction. The found the man that was taking kids. he lived in a house across the wash from the town house complex that I lived in. (If you don’t know what a wash is it is a dry river bed). When the police showed up the man barricaded himself in the house when the police showed up. The man (I have no idea what his name was) left his house in a body bag. I don’t remember that part but I remember the police helicopters and the lights from the cars. That was really the night that I learned that humans are much scarier than any fictional monster that I could read about or see on the screen.