Bog Tour: The Golden Key by Marion Womack


In the last couple of years there has been a increase in authors who release playlists while they are either working on their project or after they are done with their projects. This gives readers a glimpse into how their minds think when they are working. I am pleased to be part of the blog tour for The Golden Key. Marion has put together a great playlist that she was using while she was writing it.


The Golden Key – From The Golden Key Playlist

by Marian Womack

I write to music. I find it easier to concentrate and get into my own head. Music helps me evoke the right mood, find the right words. The Golden Key is a dark, uncanny novel. This means that the list below – and my usual preferences for music as well – is dark and slightly weird. I favour female singers, and I like to write to the sound of song; I do not mind hearing words as I write. As English is not my first language, I found the words more comforting than distracting, solitary beacons that throw messages at me in my chosen language. But I also like writing to classical music, to Celtic music, to a few operas that I love. In a way, it is strange to share the music I like writing to. It feels more intimate than speaking about my favourite books or poems; almost as if I were opening a window into the inner workings of my brain.

(1) Isobel, Bjork (Post, 1995): Brought to you by the original, one and only queen of weird music, Isobel by Bjork is the ultimate dark fairy-tale. The rhythms are hypnotic, the lyrics tell a story of female self-sufficiency, of a fearless girl, surviving the many things that lurk behind the trees. You can almost hear the rustling of the wind, the creatures advancing towards your refuge, and also the hope, in that tune in crescendo.

(2) Yes, Anastasia, Tori Amos (Under the Pink, 1994)Under the Pink was the first Tori Amos album I heard. The encounter was providential, at a time when I was struggling to find my own voice as a writer. It is difficult for me to choose a track, the album is utter perfection, and it meant so much for me. I have written often to the final one, Yes, Anastasia, a marvel of a 10 minutes song, or rather experience, the feels timeless, and goes from delicacy to intensity in a heartbeat, like an ocean throwing wave after wave. Some of Amos’s songs are like short stories, so filled are they with meaning. Her piano, her vocals, the orchestra that appears out of nowhere, all contribute to the storytelling, and make this a memorable track, difficult to get out of your head.

 (3) Black Dove, Tori Amos (From the Choirgirl Hotel, 1998): Another Tori Amos favourite to get into the right writing mood. In the same dark-fairy tale vein as IsobelBlack Dove is also a telling, perhaps retelling, of a familiar story, of a tale that we have heard sitting around the fire. Another highly hypnotic track, in great measure thanks to Amos’ vocals, to that way she has of pacing slowly across a song, making sure all the meanings are spoken, and creating a new space of possibility, where the unexpected is allowed to enter the room. 

(4) The Dark Night of the Soul, Loreena McKennitt (The Mask and the Mirror, 1994): I am very fond of this album by Loreena McKennitt. She has stated that her inspiration for it was the mixture of cultures that lived together in fifteenth century Spain, and that it was inspired by a journey that took her through Andalusia, Morocco, and beyond. Still, there is space for the Celtic Irish tunes that mirror the melodies from the North of Spain, and for Prospero’s speech, speaking not so much of the universality of Shakespeare, as to the fact that we are all overcome by the same emotions. This particular love song is a translation by a mystic Spanish poet, San Juan de la Cruz, and depicts his love for God. But its lyrics are intriguing, and its place in the middle of the album allows it to be read as a love song for a lost moment in time when the coexistence of different cultures was not impossible. 

(5) Go Long, Joanna Newsom (Have One on Me, 2010): Joanna Newsom is my favourite performer. I have seen her play in several countries, and she is the one musician I have followed obsessively since her first EP. Go Long is a track from her triptych album Have One On Me, a musical feast which has space for this retelling of Bluebeard, one of the fairy stories I am most obsessed with. The verse ‘what a woman does is open doors / it is not a question of locking or unlocking’ is a haunting reminder of the curiouser and curiouser theme running through my work.

(6) Autumn, Joanna Newsom (Have One on Me, 2010): Another one by Newsom. The death of Summer, the advent of Autumn, the year quickening to an end. There is something magical about Autumn, my favourite season of the year; and this quiet tale, where “even the ghosts / huddled up for warmth”, is the perfect reckoning 

(7) Rubycon, Part 1 and 2, Tangerine Dream (Rubycon, 1975): A track as old as I am! I find it very easy to get lost in this dual track, and seek it out deliberately when I am looking to write a weird or uncanny piece. The ending is suitably unnerving, the piece in its entirety like an episode of Sapphire and Steel on steroids. Unmissable weird music.

(8) Nu Solen Gar Ned (The Sun is Setting), Trio Mediaeval (Folk Songs, 2007): Trio Mediaeval is another of my writing staples; any album, and track. Overwhelmingly immersive, truly inspiring stuff. 

(9 y 10) Piano Concert Number 20 in D Minor, Mozart; & Bluebeard’s Castle, Bartók: When I don’t want lyrics, I look for something equally inspiring and gloomy. These two fit the bill perfectly! 


Keep reading if you want to know more about The Golden Key.

Synopsis: London, 1901. After the death of Queen Victoria the city heaves with the uncanny and the eerie. Séances are held and the dead are called upon from darker realms.

Samuel Moncrieff, recovering from a recent tragedy of his own, meets Helena Walton-Cisneros, one of London’s most reputed mediums. But Helena is not what she seems and she’s enlisted by the elusive Lady Matthews to solve a twenty-year-old mystery: the disappearance of her three stepdaughters who vanished without a trace on the Norfolk Fens.

But the Fens are a liminal land, where folk tales and dark magic still linger. With locals that speak of devilmen and catatonic children found on the Broads, Helena finds the answer to the mystery leads back to where it started: Samuel Moncrieff. 

There is one more stop on the blog tour is Looking Glass Reads!!