Tunnel Of Bones by Victoria Schwab

After reading City of Ghosts I was desperate to get my hands on a ARC for Tunnel of Bones. I called a very good friend of mine who reads a lot of MG/YA. Lo and behold she had an ARC for Tunnel of Bones. I stopped by one night and picked this lovely book up. I sat down the last week and devoured the second book in Schwab’s series. I am so glad that I read the first book and was able to read the second book without waiting.

Synopsis: A girl and her ghostly best friend go to Paris with her parents to continue making a paranormal show.

What I liked: There is so much to like about this book and series. There is a seamless transition from the first book to the second book. Many of the themes that are in the first book are carried over into the Tunnel of Bones. Schwab’s characterizations are still written so well. You truly believe that Cassidy is thinking like a 12 year old would. I love how some of the characters where carried over.

What I didn’t Like: It ended!!

Star Rating: 5 Stars

My Thoughts: These are the books I needed when I was around Cassidy’s age. I really think that Schwab is onto something with this series. It is just spooky enough for younger readers to not be frightened. But is still spooky enough to entertain older readers. I really appreciate that spooky books for MG readers are being published. I can’t wait for third book and learn more about Jacob and Cassidy.

Women In Translation: Things We Lost in The Fire by Mariana Enriquez

August is women in translation month. If by reading my blog you haven’t guessed that I read so many different things. Women authors are a particular passion of mine. Especially, women in horror authors. To know that there are so many stories out there that I haven’t read and authors that I know nothing about makes me feel like I am missing out. In researching an article for the LOHF, I found that we really are missing out on a ridiculous amount of stories.

Synopsis: A collection of short horror stories.

What I liked: I think that each story gives you a small glimpse into some of the political and social unrest in Argentina wrapped in horror stories. The stories aren’t particularly gory. But personally, I think that is more horror in the everyday that is discussed in each of the stories. There is so much to the backstories where the stories are taking place that I was very glad there was information about the landscape in Argentina while the author was growing up.

What I didn’t Like: Some of the stories where a bit too short and I wanted a bit more. It seemed as though they were cut off short and some seemed to run too long without enough meat in the story.

Star Rating: 3.5

My Thoughts: I am going to be changing the way I approach a translated work. I was reading an article about the amount of translated works that are being published in the US. I am approaching this as the content of the story not the translation itself. What I found in reading about translations, there are things that

Sing Your Sadness Deep by Laura Mauro

There is something to be said for books that you can’t put down. Where the stories pull you in and don’t let go. Where the horror creeps up on you. At first you think you are safe….but in reality you aren’t. The false sense of security it lovely….until you no longer are safe. Sing Your Sadness Deep by Laura Mauro was one of those horror sleepers.

Synopsis: Collections of short stories that are set all over from the Arizona Desert to a Frozen Finnish lake.

What I liked: There is so much to unpack in this collection. Personally, I think that love and acceptance take the center stage in many of the stories that Mauro writes. Mauro weaves love through the horror of many of the stories which such ease which says a lot about her as a writer. Mauro’s writing style is smooth and flows so well throughout the stories. The arrangement of the short stories was spot on and they flowed well with each other. Even though many of the stories were set in different places Mauro brought out the beauty and the harshness in each book.

What I didn’t like: There was nothing I didn’t like

Star Rating: 5 Stars

My Thoughts: Mauro is a helluva a writer. She is able to take very mundane situations and really twist them. I have to say the first story gave me the feels…shape shifting and stories and love. There are so many different things that I want to talk about but I don’t want to ruin the book for anyone. But I will say this Undertow is a publisher to really keep your eye on!!

How to Recognize a Demon Has Become Your Friend by Linda Addison

Over the last year, I have really gotten into collections. Short stories with a smattering of poetry makes my black heart sing. I had seen Ms. Addison perform spoken word on line at a writers event and I loved the way he wording flowed. A couple of my friends reviewed How to Recognize A Demon Has Become Your Friend and naturally they had good things to say. So when I had the opportunity to meet Linda Addison I grabbed a copy and took it with me. I didn’t make it to the panel that she was moderating but I did get to meet her in a signing line. I was so thrilled to meet her.

Synopsis: Collection of horror short stories and poetry.

What I liked: I loved the whole thing. It made me so happy just reading through the stories and poems. The darkness and the horror that is bubbling under the surface of so many of the stories. Many aren’t in your face but rather a slow burn that creeps under your skin. There are short stories that I would love to see expanded. Addison is also such an amazing poet. The poems are complex, heartbreaking on one hand and horrifying on the other. AND….the best part

What I didn’t like: There is nothing I didn’t like about this collection.

Star Rating: 4.5 Stars

My Thoughts: There is something very special about this collection. Two of the stories are linked. I loved this because the first story was so good and I wanted more of the two characters. I enjoy how Addison uses language. From her word choices to the voice in which she writes. It is uniquely hers. I read a lot of horror and the cadence in which she writes is different then many of the authors that I have read before.

Witches by Donna Lynch

My dad is a believer. He believes that we as people have the ability to be magic. Not like Magic that was in The Craft but rather magic that is fluid and calls upon nature. Over the years he has had the most amazing library of books about natural power that I have always been a believer. Recently my father had a small surgery. Nothing earth shattering but just enough to worry me. He came out of surgery fine. At his post op appointment later that week his doctor remarked on how fast my dad heals. My dad just chuckles and tells the doctor “I told my body to heal”. My dad just seems to get it; he always has. I was was really stoked when Raw Dog Screaming Press asked if I would review Witches by Donna Lynch.

Synopsis: A illustrated horror poetry collection about witches.

What I liked: I loved the mixed media used through out the book. I have a deep love for mixed media art and it’s use in a literary context. The poetry was viscera and I loved the history that was sprinkled throughout like little gifts. What I really enjoyed was that the book was like a graphic novel or comic book with horror poetry!! The first poem gripped me by the eyeballs and kept me reading through it. Lynch is very talented and I can’t wait to read more from her.

What I didn’t like: There was nothing I didn’t like

Star Rating: 4.5 Stars

My Thoughts: I want to hug this poetry collection. I have revisited a few of the poems and they still give me the feels. I really appreciate the time that went into this collection. The thought that went into the illustrations and how well they worked with the poems. Lynch’s writing is like a gut punch. Pretty words that are meant to make you feel something that isn’t necessarily pretty. Which we all know is the way to my heart.